Andrew Lo: The Adaptive Markets Hypothesis

Background (Via Wikipedia)

Andrew Lo is a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management. A leading authority on hedge funds, he proposed the Adaptive market hypothesis, is author of several academic articles in Finance and Financial economics.

Paper 1: The Adaptive Markets Hypothesis: Market Efficiency From An Evolutionary Perspective (Click Here To Read The Paper)

One of the most inuential ideas in the past 30 years of the Journal of Portfolio Management is the Efficient Markets Hypothesis, the idea that market prices incorporate all information rationally and instantaneously. However, the emerging discipline of behavioral economics and fi nance has challenged this hypothesis, arguing that markets are not rational, but are driven by fear and greed instead. Recent research in the cognitive neurosciences suggests that these two perspectives are opposite sides of the same coin. In this article I propose a new framework that reconciles market efficiency with behavioral alternatives by applying the principles of evolution|competition, adaptation, and natural selection|to nancial interactions. By extending Herbert Simon’s notion of satisficing” with evolutionary dynamics, I argue that much of what behavioralists cite as counterexamples to economic rationality|loss aversion, overcon dence, overreaction, mental accounting, and other behavioral biases|are, in fact, consistent with an evolutionary model of individuals adapting to a changing environment via simple heuristics. Despite the qualitative nature of this new paradigm, the Adaptive Markets Hypothesis off ers a number of surprisingly concrete implications for the practice of portfolio management.

Paper 2: Reconciling Efficient Markets with Behavioral Finance: The Adaptive Markets Hypothesis (Click Here To Read The Paper)

The battle between proponents of the Efficient Markets Hypothesis and champions of behavioral finance has never been more pitched, and there is little consensus as to which side is winning or what the implications are for investment management and consulting. In this article, I review the case for and against the Efficient Markets Hypothesis, and describe a new framework – the Adaptive Markets Hypothesis – in which the traditional models of modern financial economics can co-exist alongside behavioral models in an intellectually consistent manner. Based on evolutionary principles, the Adaptive Markets Hypothesis implies that the degree of market efficiency is related to environmental factors characterizing market ecology such as the number of competitors in the market, the magnitude of profit opportunities available, and the adaptability of the market participants. Many of the examples that behavioralists cite as violations of rationality that are inconsistent with market efficiency – loss aversion, overconfidence, overreaction, mental accounting, and other behavioral biases – are, in fact, consistent with an evolutionary model of individuals adapting to a changing environment via simple heuristics. Despite the qualitative nature of this new paradigm, I show that the Adaptive Markets Hypothesis yields a number of surprisingly concrete applications for both investment managers and consultants.

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29. October 2009 by Miguel Barbosa
Categories: Curated Readings, Finance & Investing | Leave a comment

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