Blinded by anger or feeling the love: How emotions influence advice taking

Abstract (via Journal of Applied Psychology)

Across 2 experiments, the authors demonstrate that emotional states influence how receptive people are to advice. The focus of these experiments is on incidental emotions, emotions triggered by a prior experience that is irrelevant to the current situation. The authors demonstrate that people who feel incidental gratitude are more trusting and more receptive to advice than are people in a neutral emotional state, and people in a neutral state are more trusting and more receptive to advice than are people who  feel incidental anger. In these experiments, greater receptivity to advice increased judgment accuracy. People who felt incidental gratitude were more accurate than were people in a neutral state, and people in a neutral state were more accurate than were people who felt incidental anger. The results offer insight into how people use advice, and the authors identify conditions under which leaders, policy makers, and advisors may be particularly influential.

Useful for Investors (via Journal Of Applied Psychology)

Prior research has shown that when people have an opinion of their own, they consistently discount the opinion of others relative to their own However, characteristics of both the advisor and the decision influence how receptive people are to advice.

Additional Excerpt (via Journal of Applied Psychology)

Although people may have many reasons to reject or to take the advice they receive from others, prior research has failed to account for the role that emotions might play in the advice-taking process. Emotions may influence advice taking in several ways. First, the person receiving advice may feel emotions for or related to the person giving the advice. Second, the decision itself may be affect rich. For example, the decision to place one’s parents in a nursing facility and to sell their house is likely to trigger many emotions. Third, incidental emotions that stem from a prior, unrelated experience may influence how responsive individuals are to advice.

Finding (via Journal of Applied Psychology)

Our findings suggest that people receiving advice should be mindful of their emotions. People frequently receive advice before making important decisions, and our results identify conditions under which people might overweight bad advice or underweight good advice. Before consulting others, we should be sure to ask ourselves, are we blinded by anger or are we feeling the love?

Click Here To Read: Blinded by anger or feeling the love: How emotions influence advice taking

About Miguel Barbosa

I run this site.

04. March 2010 by Miguel Barbosa
Categories: Curated Readings, Psychology & Sociology | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *