Before the measurement of prejudice: early psychological and sociological papers on prejudice.

Abstract (Via Webster RJ, Saucier DA, Harris RJ.)

Given its renown, many psychologists and sociologists likely consider the publication of Gordon Allport’s (1954/1979) seminal book The Nature of Prejudice as the inauguration of the psychological study of prejudice. However, we have uncovered rarely-cited, published papers (starting in 1830) that provide a wealth of speculation on prejudice even before psychologists/sociologists attempted to measure it (circa 1925). Thus, this paper intends to discuss early published work on prejudice in psychology and sociology by focusing on three key questions: a) when did psychologists/sociologists recognize prejudice as a psychological phenomenon, b) when did psychologists/sociologists recognize prejudice as a phenomenon in need of study, and c) what were the historical and personal conditions that gave rise to the interest in prejudice? In short, the seeds of prejudice research were maturing for some time before Allport’s seminal book and the first attitudinal studies on prejudice, although these earlier works are seldom cited.

Click Here To Read: Before the measurement of prejudice: early psychological and sociological papers on prejudice.

About Miguel Barbosa

I run this site.

24. July 2010 by Miguel Barbosa
Categories: Curated Readings, Psychology & Sociology | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *